Cryotherapy

A whole-body approach to help reduce pain, relieve inflammation, improve skin tone and boost general health and wellbeing.
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The Cool Way to Boost Health + Vitality

The benefits of applying ice to relieve pain and inflammation are well known. Cryotherapy takes these benefits to the next level with a whole-body approach to help reduce pain, relieve inflammation, improve skin tone and boost general health and wellbeing.

Cryotherapy exposes your body to extremely cold temperatures for a short period of time. This exposure triggers increased blood circulation throughout the body, delivering a range of flow-on benefits. These may include pain relief, enhanced movement, reduced skin inflammation and muscle healing.

Cryotherapy is a non-invasive treatment that requires no recovery period; results vary but generally can be seen within 10 – 15 minutes. With the procedure itself taking less than 5 minutes, you’ll be in and out of our Darwin clinic in no time at all.

For help with:

+ pain relief
+ redness and inflammation (eg psoriasis/eczema)
+ muscle healing
+ weight loss
+ migraine headaches
+ mental wellbeing
+ improved sleep
+ chronic pain
+ joint stiffness
+ energy & mood

Frequently Asked Questions

What does the treatment involve?

Whole-body cryotherapy is conducted in a dedicated cryotherapy cabin. Wearing socks, gloves and underwear, you’ll step into the cabin with your head exposed for safety. The cabin’s monitor will keep you constantly updated as you slowly rotate in a mist of sub-freezing air particles.

You may feel uncomfortable during the session as your body experiences temperatures of
-120 to -150 °C for 2-3 minutes, but this is temporary. Our trained technician will closely monitor your progress throughout your treatment.

Is it safe?

Cryotherapy is considered safe in short sessions of under 4 minutes. Inbuilt safety features such as infrared head sensors and thermal imaging cameras further ensure your safety during your session. Our trained technician is also on hand at all times.

Please note, it’s best to seek medical advice before commencing cryotherapy if you have high blood pressure, a heart condition, diabetes or if you’re pregnant.

What results can I expect?

Research indicates that cryotherapy has multiple benefits, so you may notice results such as improved skin tone, a reduction in pain and any skin inflammation, enhanced movement, and a sense of mental wellbeing.

While studies are still ongoing, cryotherapy appears to support weight loss programs, help reduce the severity of migraines and may even help prevent age-related cognitive decline, such as dementia.

How long do results last?

This will vary from person to person. Generally, results can be seen within 10 – 15 minutes of treatment and can last up to 8 hours. Regular sessions may be recommended depending on your individual goals.

References

Rymaszewska, J., Ramsey, D., & Chładzińska-Kiejna, S. (2008, February). Whole-body cryotherapy as adjunct treatment of depressive and anxiety disorders. Archivum Immunologiae et Therapiae Experimentalis, 56(1), 63-68 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2734249/

Kliemenko T, et al. (2008). Whole-body cryotherapy in atopic dermatitis. DOI: 10.1001/archderm.144.6.806 https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamadermatology/fullarticle/419737

Costello, J. T., Baker, P. R., Minett, G. M., Bieuzen, F., Stewart, I. B., & Bleakley, C. (2015, September 18). Whole-body cryotherapy (extreme cold air exposure) for preventing and treating muscle soreness after exercise in adults [Abstract]. Cochrane Database of Systemic Reviews, 2015(9) http://www.cochrane.org/CD010789/MUSKINJ_whole-body-cryotherapy-preventing-and-treating-muscle-soreness-after-exercise

Misiak, B., & Kiejna, A. (2012, July). Translating whole-body cryotherapy into geriatric psychiatry–a proposed strategy for the prevention of Alzheimer’s disease [Abstract]. Medical Hypotheses, 79(1), 56-58 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22541861

Sprouse BA, et al. (2013). Randomized controlled trial: targeted neck cooling in the treatment of the migraine patient. DOI: https://.www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3727573/